Upper School Summer Reading

Summer Reading List for English 9

 

Here it is!  Just what you have been waiting for to make your summer before your ninth grade year complete!  The summer reading list!  Don’t panic.  You have to read only one book this summer, and I am giving you some tips that will help you be able to start out your ninth grade year with a great grade.  Just remember the following guidelines:

The book must be read in the original, unabridged version.

Movies, Cliff’s Notes, Spark Notes, comics, and illustrated classics from Wal-Mart may be helpful, BUT THEY WILL NOT BE ACCEPTABLE AS SUBSTITUTES FOR READING THE ENTIRE BOOK.

You may NOT read a book that you have read before for a book report.

Do not wait until the week before school starts to begin your reading!

Here are the tips for effective reading.  Remember that during the first few weeks of school you will be required to prepare a writing assignment based on your summer reading.

  1. Write down each character’s name as he or she is introduced, and describe each one.  As you read, indicate the importance of each character in the book.
  2. Summarize what happens in the book.  What are the important conflicts?
  3. Write down a few statements or ideas from the book that are especially noteworthy or meaningful.  Be sure to note from what chapter the quotation was taken.
  4. Is the ending of the book satisfactory?  What are the implications of the ending and its effect on the main character?  Was the main character successful in overcoming a difficulty?  Why or why not?  How much do you sympathize with the main character?
  5. To what extent do you think that the book was worthwhile?  Did it help you gain some insight on life or to come to a greater understanding in any way?

Here is the list of book from which you may choose.  Please do not substitute any other book for a book from this list.  All of these books are available from libraries, from used bookstores, fro regular bookstores, or online.

Alice in Wonderland--Lewis Carroll  

A Journey to the Center of the Earth-- Jules Verne

The Hound of the Baskervilles--Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 

Diary of a Young Girl--Anne Frank    

Death Be Not Proud--John Gunther  

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde--Robert Louis Stevenson

Huckleberry Finn--Mark Twain

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Summer Reading List for English 10

 

Here it is!  Just what you have been waiting for to make your summer before your sophomore year complete!  The summer reading list!  Don’t panic.  You have to read only two books this summer, and I am giving you some tips that will help you be able to start out your 10th grade year with some great grades.  Just remember the following guidelines:

  1. The books must be read in the original, unabridged version.
  2. Movies, Cliff’s Notes, Spark Notes, comics, and illustrated classics from Wal-Mart may be helpful, BUT THEY WILL NOT BE ACCEPTABLE SUBSTITUTES FOR READING THE ENTIRE BOOK.
  3. You may NOT read a book that you have read before for a book report.
  4. Do not wait until the week before school starts to begin your reading!

Here are the tips for effective reading.  Remember that during the first few weeks of school you will be required to prepare writing assignments based on your reading.

  1. Write down each character’s name as he or she is introduced, and describe each character.  As you read, indicate the importance of each character in the book.   
  2. Summarize what happens in the book.  What are the important conflicts?
  3. Write down a few statements or ideas from the book that are especially noteworthy or meaningful.  Be sure to note from what chapter the quotations are taken.
  4. Is the ending of the book satisfactory?  What are the implications of the ending and its effect on the main character?  Was the main character successful in overcoming a difficulty?  Why or why not?  How much do you sympathize with the main character?
  5. To what extent do you think that the book was worthwhile?  Did it help you to gain some insight on life or come to some greater understanding?

Here is the list of books from which you may choose.  Please do not substitute any other book for a book from this list.  All of these books are available from libraries, from used bookstores, from regular bookstores, or online.

 

The Day Christ Died by Jim Bishop                                     Christy by Catherine Marshall

The Story of My Life by Helen Keller                                   China Cry by Nora Lam

The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas                      The Pearl  by John Steinbeck

The Cross and the Switchblade by David Wilkerson           War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemmingway

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

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Summer Reading List for English 11

Here it is!  Just what you have been waiting for to make your summer before your junior year complete!  The summer reading list!

Don’t panic.  You have to read only two books this summer, and I am giving you some tips that will help you be able to start out your eleventh grade year with some great grades.  Just remember the following guidelines:

  1. The books must be read in the original, unabridged version.

  2. Movies, Cliff’s Notes, Spark Notes, comics, and illustrated classics from Wal-Mart may be helpful, BUT THEY WILL NOT BE ACCEPTABLE SUBSTITUTES FOR READING THE ENTIRE BOOKS.

  3. You may NOT read a book that you have read before for a book report.

  4. Do not wait until the week before school starts to begin your reading.

    Here are the tips for effective reading.  Remember that during the first few weeks of school you will be required to prepare writing assignments based on your reading.

  1. Write down each character’s name as he or she is introduced, and describe each character. 
  2. As you read, indicate the importance of each character in the book.
  3. Summarize what happens in the book.  What are the important conflicts?
  4. Write down a few statements or ideas from the book that are especially noteworthy or meaningful.  Be sure to note from what chapter the quotations are taken.
  5. Is the ending of the book satisfactory?  What are the implications of the ending and its effect on the main character?  Was the main character successful in overcoming a difficulty?  Why or why not?  How much so you sympathize with the main character?

Here is the list of books from which you may choose.  Please do not substitute any other book for a book from this list.  All of these books are available from libraries, from used bookstores, from regular bookstores, or online.

Little Women by Louisa Alcott           

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper   

In His Steps by Charles Sheldon

The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane    

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Shadow of the Almighty by Elizabeth Elliot   

The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain

The House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Thread That Runs So True by Jesse Stuart  

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Summer Reading List for English 12

Here it is!  Just what you have been waiting for to make your summer before your senior year complete!  The summer reading list!  Don’t panic.  You have to read only two books this summer, and I am giving you some tips that will help you be able to start out your senior year with some great grades.  Just remember the following guidelines:

  1. The books must be read in the original, unabridged version.
  2. Movies, Cliff’s Notes, Spark Notes, comics, and illustrated classics from  Wal-Mart may be helpful, BUT THEY WILL NOT BE ACCEPTABLE SUBSTITUTES FOR READING THE ENTIRE BOOKS.
  3. You may NOT read a book that you have read before for a book report.
  4. Do not wait until the week before school starts to begin your reading.

Here are the tips for effective reading.  Remember that during the first few weeks of school you will be required to prepare writing assignments based on your reading.

  1. Write down each character’s name as he or she is introduced, and describe each one.  As you read, indicate the importance of each character in the book.
  2. Summarize what happens in the book.  What are the important conflicts?
  3. Write down a few statements or ideas from the book that are especially noteworthy or meaningful.  Be sure to note from what chapter any quotations are taken.
  4. Is the ending of the book satisfactory?  What are the implications of the ending and its effects on the main character?  Was the main character successful in overcoming a difficulty?  Why or why not?  How much do you sympathize with the main character?
  5. To what extent do you think that the book was worthwhile?  Did it help you to gain some insight about life or to come to a greater understanding in any way?

Here is the list of books from which you may choose.  Please do not substitute any other book for a book from this list.  All of these books are available from libraries, from used or regular bookstores, and online.

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen                  Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott                                  David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

Goodbye, Mr. Chips by James Hilton                   The Black Arrow by Robert L. Stevenson

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley          

The Time Machine by H. G. Wells          

The Idylls of the King by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde